Episode 116: Rescreening Thief

“Could I have worked under a system where there were Draconian controls on my creativity, meaning budget, time, script choices, etc.? Definitely not. I would have fared poorly under the old studio system that guys like Howard Hawks did so well in. I cannot just make a film and walk away from it. I need that creative intimacy and, quite frankly, the control to execute my visions, on all my projects.”

Michael Mann, Director of Thief

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On Episode 116 of Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor Rescreen Michael Mann’s Thief and provide a First Impression of the next Rescreening episode title, John Cassavetes’ A Woman Under the Influence.

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Michael Clawson on Letterboxd | Taylor Baker on Letterboxd

Thief Trailer

Thief is currently available to stream on the Criterion Channel.

A Woman Under the Influence is currently streaming on the Criterion Channel and HBO Max.

Episode 108: Rescreening Donkey Skin

“There’s a bit of happiness in simply wanting happiness.”

Jacques Demy

This week on Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor Rescreen Jacques Demy’s Donkey Skin and provide a First Impression of the next Rescreening episode title, Robert Altman’s Short Cuts.

Streaming links for titles this episode

Donkey Skin is currently streaming on the Criterion Channel

Short Cuts is available to purchase physically but is not currently digitally available

Or connect with the guys on Letterboxd | Michael Clawson on Letterboxd | Taylor Baker on Letterboxd

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Episode 102: Abbas Kiarostami: Certified Copy / Close Up / The Wind Will Carry Us

“I’ve often noticed that we are not able to look at what we have in front of us, unless it’s inside a frame.”

Abbas Kiarostami

Links: Apple Podcasts | Castbox | Google Podcasts | LibSyn | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube

This week on Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor discuss their First Impressions of: Waiting for the Barbarians & The Book of Vision and the Abbas Kiarostami Feature Films: Certified Copy, Close Up, and The Wind Will Carry Us.

Streaming links for titles this episode

Certified Copy is currently available on Criterion Channel

Close Up is currently available on Criterion Channel

The Wind Will Carry Us is currently available to rent or purchase

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Lola (1961)

Written by Taylor Baker

88/100

Anouk Aimée’s eponymous character Lola like the film is graceful, gorgeous, and effortless. Aspects equally shared in the choreography of the camera. The depth of field present in nearly every shot from Cinematographer Raoul Coutard adds detail to the life of the city and the interiors. This coupled with Demy’s unique blend of visual and narrative romanticism steeped in harsh circumstance is something you can practically taste. 

Quick cuts, lingering moments, shadow cast walls, expert mirroring, nearly every window used as a source of light. It’s hard not to fall in love with Lola, just as easily as Marc Michel’s Roland does. Demy’s first feature length film follows two separated lovers Lola and Roland as they reconnect after a chance bump along an outdoor hall of businesses that like nearly every other scene in the film looks absolutely stunning. 

Lola sprawls around the city and interiority of the characters without a lag, never getting sidetracked, or interrupted by communicating something pointless to the viewer verbally. Demy even early on understood well that showing instead of telling in filmmaking would serve his stories. Though it’s a debut, you can see all the early workings of a master, playing with the image, the narrative, the characters, and most of all the viewers expectations. As the first stepping stone of a career Lola soars to heights that many directors don’t achieve in their careers. 

Lola Trailer

Lola is currently streaming on Criterion Channel and Kanopy