Fantasia Film Festival 2021 Review: The Righteous

Written by Taylor Baker

65/100

Mark O’Brien’s directorial debut The Righteous is a severe film detailing Frederic Mason’s (Henry Czerny) and Ethyl Mason (Mimi Kuzuk) next steps after losing their adopted daughter. Near the outset of the film Doris the biological mother is sitting across from Kuzuk’s Ethyl asking about how the service was. She was unable to come due to working at the local steakhouse. It feels like a typical scene at first, until we realize the role each plays, and watching Ethyl try to be strong in front of Doris, while she’s grieving for her lost child internally directly after her funeral.

Following this event Mark O’Brien’s character, Aaron Smith appears under unusual circumstances. He’s hobbled with an injured foot or ankle, and lost in the woods. Frederic agrees to take him in for the night, against Ethyl’s wishes. Ethyl convinces a local cop to stop by on her way home and on her arrival Frederic invents a story, claiming Aaron as his long lost nephew and hustling Officer Hutton on her way. Frederic and Aaron share an odd late night cup of tea, and Frederic wakes up with a start to Aaron and Ethyl cooking and chortling with laughter in the kitchen.

Fantasia Film Festival 2021 

Jason Clarke’s no frills production design, offer a believable secluded cabin and small town feel. Scott McClellan serves as cinematographer and captures a few meticulously crafted shots that are captivatingly lit and terrifically framed. The outdoor sequence detailing Aaron’s arrival is one such particular shot. Editor K. Spencer Jones weaves the film together in a coherent and captivating way that doesn’t seem like it could be improved upon with any change.

While I’m not convinced by O’Brien’s first feature screenplay, it certainly seems like he’s come to play as a director. With masterful lighting, and industrious acting from perennially overlooked performers O’Brien seems to know how to lean on talent. The Righteous might be the first in a long line of films from O’Brien. But the journeys still out on whether those films will continue to be written by him, and I take no satisfaction from my lack of confidence in his writing. I’d be happy to see him grow, and be proven wrong.

The Righteous Clip

The Righteous was screened as part of the Fantasia 2021 Film Festival.

You can follow more of Taylor’s work on Letterboxd and Rotten Tomatoes.

Episode 84: VIFF Kickoff / The Devil All the Time / Sibyl / Siberia

“Life is what happens when you’re doing other things, right?”

Abel Ferrara

Links: Apple Podcasts | Castbox | Google Podcasts | LibSyn | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube

This week on Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor discuss their First Impressions of: The Trial of the Chicago 7 & Shithouse. Followed by The Devil All the Time, Sibyl, and the VIFF 2020 Official Selection Siberia.

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Streaming links for titles this episode

The Devil All the Time on Netflix

Siberia is currently seeking distribution

Sybil is currently available to rent from multiple sources.

The Devil All the Time

Written by Nick McCann

84/100

As far as getting new releases, this year bites. It’s a good thing the streaming platforms all had full banks to deploy. Admittedly I’m still not all that enthused with Netflix originals, but the output has been steadily improving these last few years. This particular release captured my interest with it’s Appalachia aesthetic and emphasis on story.

The story covers a range of characters, places and time periods. I found it reminiscent of when films strove for artistic quality on top of pure entertainment. I was hooked all the way through. It moves along at a slow pace. In each situation we see the fates of these characters come to fruition. Fate is the keyword. As you feel the momentum build up to a crescendo, you also come to realize the title itself bears good meaning. For all the faith a person can have, their inner demons always rear their heads. This is an involving and thematically rich tale full of betrayal, lust and suspense.

There’s a great cast. Each does an excellent job justifying the part they play. Tom Holland leads with his most raw role to date. You feel for him instantly once he comes on screen as a young man shaped by tragedy and trying to get by in gritty surroundings. This is another reliable turn out by Robert Pattinson as a borderline mad preacher. You also get a scuzzy Sebastian Stan, Jason Clarke being creepy, a brief turn from Mia Wasikowska and more. It’s the kind of movie where I loved getting to know the characters and watching them come together.

On the technical side, the production design was convincing at realizing this setting. In a rickety looking past that’s full of character. The cinematography delivers too, lingering on moments of heavy emotion and moving with life when things get lively. The soundtrack and score help sell the immersion of its time period. It’s the kind of movie where I wouldn’t mind seeing a normal day go on in this community.

There’s some fleeting bits of action when the emotions and suspense start to peak. These sequences are well executed, building up to the absolute edge before ending as fast as they start. The one nitpick I have is you can see where they edit a frame out to sell a punch better. Still there are some hard hitting beat downs. Scenes with guns fare much better with an emphasized realism on the violence. The blood and make-up effects are good. Don’t take this as saying its action at every turn. When conflict arises, it feels natural and is appealing in how grounded it is kept.

If this were on physical media, I can see myself picking up a copy. The Devil All the Time is a solid character drama that takes you on a good haul with a flawed and vulnerable ensemble. The world the film paints around them, one of misinterpretation and corruption, is one I found enjoyable to get engaged with.

The Devil All the Time Trailer

Currently available to stream on Netflix

Episode 83: An American Pickle / She Dies Tomorrow / Waiting for the Barbarians

“Losing all the preconceptions that I had about storytelling, about the world, you know, and learning to see the world from a different perspective. It sounds romantic, but it’s not an easy process at all.”

Ciro Guerra

Links: Apple Podcasts | Castbox | Google Podcasts | LibSyn | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube

This week on Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor discuss their First Impressions of a duo of Netflix Releases in The Devil All the Time & I’m Thinking of Ending Things. Followed by the Titles: An American Pickle, She Dies Tomorrow, and Waiting for the Barbarians.

We’d like to thank PODGO for sponsoring us this episode.
You can explore sponsorship opportunities and start monetizing your podcast by signing up here. And when you do let them know we sent you!

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Streaming links for titles this episode

An American Pickle on HBO Max

She Dies Tomorrow and Waiting for the Barbarians on Hulu

First Man

Written by Taylor Baker

96/100

Visual Jazz

Chazelle assembles a first-rate series of high high’s, high low’s, low high’s, and low low’s. I couldn’t agree more with everyone heaping praise upon the technical proficiency found aboundingly in this film. If one were to put it in a class of technical mastery based off of recent films you would lump it amongst Blade Runner 2049, Dunkirk, and just ever so slightly beneath Mad Max: Fury Road. During this film I experienced shock, awe, jubilation, grief, anger, and solace. Chazelle tosses narrative norms to the side and brings you into an emotional ride loosely tied together by it’s handful of main characters and main goal.

Reach the Moon.

I’ve been trying to think about it’s narrative depths so as to express it’s wrinkles and omages and it keeps slipping through my fingers like that fine grain silt on the Moon’s surface. What I am absolutely certain of is that beauty and love are the two most apt words to describe what Chazelle packs into First Man’s omages to 2001: A Space Odyssey. The lights reflected to us off of Gosling’s helmet near the end, the docking sequence, the brief AI concern, the Moon as a monolith, and that last shot of Foy reflected off the glass within Gosling’s head. The love while not easy to see on the surface was always there, it was behind everything. Behind the sacrifices.

Gosling’s performance is amazing, and of the Fall fare as of yet Foy’s supporting role is peerless. The entire ensemble is almost sure to grab the best ensemble cast this year unless Vice or Widows really floor audiences. This is a bonafide blockbuster and a wonder to behold. See it in a premium format if you can, whether it’s IMAX or Dolby you won’t be let down.

Highly Recommended.

Taylor Baker originally posted this review on Letterboxd 10/12/18