The Devil All the Time

Written by Nick McCann

84/100

As far as getting new releases, this year bites. It’s a good thing the streaming platforms all had full banks to deploy. Admittedly I’m still not all that enthused with Netflix originals, but the output has been steadily improving these last few years. This particular release captured my interest with it’s Appalachia aesthetic and emphasis on story.

The story covers a range of characters, places and time periods. I found it reminiscent of when films strove for artistic quality on top of pure entertainment. I was hooked all the way through. It moves along at a slow pace. In each situation we see the fates of these characters come to fruition. Fate is the keyword. As you feel the momentum build up to a crescendo, you also come to realize the title itself bears good meaning. For all the faith a person can have, their inner demons always rear their heads. This is an involving and thematically rich tale full of betrayal, lust and suspense.

There’s a great cast. Each does an excellent job justifying the part they play. Tom Holland leads with his most raw role to date. You feel for him instantly once he comes on screen as a young man shaped by tragedy and trying to get by in gritty surroundings. This is another reliable turn out by Robert Pattinson as a borderline mad preacher. You also get a scuzzy Sebastian Stan, Jason Clarke being creepy, a brief turn from Mia Wasikowska and more. It’s the kind of movie where I loved getting to know the characters and watching them come together.

On the technical side, the production design was convincing at realizing this setting. In a rickety looking past that’s full of character. The cinematography delivers too, lingering on moments of heavy emotion and moving with life when things get lively. The soundtrack and score help sell the immersion of its time period. It’s the kind of movie where I wouldn’t mind seeing a normal day go on in this community.

There’s some fleeting bits of action when the emotions and suspense start to peak. These sequences are well executed, building up to the absolute edge before ending as fast as they start. The one nitpick I have is you can see where they edit a frame out to sell a punch better. Still there are some hard hitting beat downs. Scenes with guns fare much better with an emphasized realism on the violence. The blood and make-up effects are good. Don’t take this as saying its action at every turn. When conflict arises, it feels natural and is appealing in how grounded it is kept.

If this were on physical media, I can see myself picking up a copy. The Devil All the Time is a solid character drama that takes you on a good haul with a flawed and vulnerable ensemble. The world the film paints around them, one of misinterpretation and corruption, is one I found enjoyable to get engaged with.

The Devil All the Time Trailer

Currently available to stream on Netflix