Episode 95: RoboCop / Starship Troopers / Miami Vice

“I don’t underestimate audiences’ intelligence. Audiences are much brighter than media gives them credit for. When people went to a movie once a week in the 1930s and that was their only exposure to media, you were required to do a different grammar.”

Michael Mann

Links: Apple Podcasts | Castbox | Google Podcasts | LibSyn | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube

This week on Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor discuss their First Impressions of Project Power & She Dies Tomorrow and the Feature Films: RoboCop, Starship Troopers, and Miami Vice.

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Streaming links for titles this episode

RoboCop is currently available on Prime Video

Starship Troopers is currently available on Tubi TV

Miami Vice is currently available to rent or purchase

Episode 83: An American Pickle / She Dies Tomorrow / Waiting for the Barbarians

“Losing all the preconceptions that I had about storytelling, about the world, you know, and learning to see the world from a different perspective. It sounds romantic, but it’s not an easy process at all.”

Ciro Guerra

Links: Apple Podcasts | Castbox | Google Podcasts | LibSyn | Spotify | Stitcher | YouTube

This week on Drink in the Movies Michael & Taylor discuss their First Impressions of a duo of Netflix Releases in The Devil All the Time & I’m Thinking of Ending Things. Followed by the Titles: An American Pickle, She Dies Tomorrow, and Waiting for the Barbarians.

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Streaming links for titles this episode

An American Pickle on HBO Max

She Dies Tomorrow and Waiting for the Barbarians on Hulu

She Dies Tomorrow

Written by Michael Clawson

80/100

Paranoia spreads like a virus in Seimetz’s sci-fi-inflected psycho-thriller, which shows her deftly threading black comedy through gloomy atmosphere. The outbreak starts with Kate Lyn Sheil’s Amy. For reasons unknown, she’s got it in her head that the next day will be her last, and she passes that conviction on to a friend, played by the eccentric, very funny Jane Adams, who spreads it further. Seimetz taps each character’s reckoning with their mortality for bleak humor while keeping dread in the air, pulling off a tricky tonal balancing act. Kate Lyn Sheil and Jane Adams are the two clear standouts among a solid cast. Sheil bears what comes across as true despair in Amy, despair that provokes makeup smearing tears and depressive shuffling around her new house as she listens to a haunting Mozart record on repeat. Above all, what’s alluring is Seitmetz’s control of mood, and the strobing red and blue light and swirling bacterial imagery she punctuates it with. There’s nothing more anxiety-provoking than the thought that tomorrow, everything could come to an end, but maybe there’s some consolation to be found in seeing that the fear passes through a lot of us at some point. It isn’t any less scary, but maybe it’s a little less lonely.

Michael Clawson originally published this review on Letterboxd 08/13/20

Available for rent from most services.