Retrospective Feature: Fast & Furious Saga

Written by Alexander Reams

What started out as a glorified Point Break ripoff has snowballed into one of the biggest action franchises of all time and also one of the biggest soap operas in history. A series spanning 20 years, 8 films, 1 spin off, and a countless array of cars destroyed. Before the newest comes out, join me as I briefly discuss each film, note important characters introduced and events in the film. 

Without further ado, let’s jump in.

The Fast and the Furious (2001) 

Dir. Rob Cohen

45/100

In the early 2000s, countless films wanted to be a part of the glory days of the 1990s action films. Then a street racing film full of relatively unknown actors released in the summer of 2001. While The Fast and the Furious is a fun summer movie, its style is far too frenetic and juvenile to warrant repeated viewings. Specifically the race war scene and the race between Dom (Vin Diesel) and Brian O’Connor (Paul Walker) are fun to watch. There was no plan for sequels when this came out, and despite this the groundwork was being laid for a massive franchise. Besides introducing Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, and Michelle Rodriguez, the film introduces the budding relationship between Jordana Brewster’s “Mia Torretto” and Brian O’Connor. 

2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)

Dir. John Singleton

42/100

Before I even begin to critique the film as a whole, I cannot ignore the absolute stupidity of the title. There were so many different options to choose from, with the most obvious probably being the best one, The Fast and the Furious 2. Now, at the height of mid-2000s fashion, the newest Fast and Furious came out, and directed by John Singleton?! The same director from Boyz n’ the Hood and Shaft (2000). How could he make such a terrible film? The missing piece is Vin Diesel, the bond he and Walker formed in the first film is broken by the absence of Diesel and takes away a massive pull to watching this series. In the end it makes this one of the least rewatchable films in the franchise.

Groundwork laid: Introduction of Roman Pierce (Tyrese Gibson) and Tej Parker (Ludacris).  

The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift (2006)

Dir. Justin Lin

61/100

After the critical and commercial failure of the previous film. Universal brought in fresh blood to direct, Justin Lin, who was coming off the critical success of Better Luck Tomorrow. As well as a brand new cast including Lucas Black, Sung Kang, and 2000’s icon Lil Bow Wow. This is also the first time that the series had shown real stakes in the death of Sung Kang’s “Han Seoul-Oh”. While also introducing another world of racing that had not been shown on film before. The style Lin brought to the film was similar to what had previously been done before, however it had more finesse of a better director which made the film far superior than the previous entries. The only connection to the previous films that appeared in this film was Vin Diesel in a cameo role at the end. 

Groundwork & Timeline Information: Introduction of Han Seoul-Oh and Sean Boswell (Lucas Black). Also providing the catalyst for Furious 7 to start off from. 

Fast & Furious (2009)

Dir. Justin Lin 

35/100

Unfortunately the fun from the previous film would run out here. Widely regarded to be the worst of the franchise and deservedly so. There is not much I can bash about that hasn’t already been said about this film. 

Groundwork & Timeline Information: To account for absences, this is set between 2 Fast 2 Furious and The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift. Also the introduction of Leo and Santos. As well as the crime lord Arturo Braga and Gal Gadot’s Gisele.

Fast Five (2011)

Dir. Justin Lin

76/100

The first time that the franchise was truly celebrated by critics and audiences alike. A true reinvention of the franchise that was full of life and joy. As well as being one of the best heist films of the 21st century. Bringing together everyone that has been introduced in the previous films to form a crew who are all on the point of desperation. Dom, Mia, and Brian are all fugitives after breaking Dom out from prison. However with all of that added stress, Dwayne Johnson joins the cast as Agent Luke Hobbs chasing down the fugitives. Add in wonderfully choreographed action and an amazing finale and you have one of the best action films of the 2010s. 

Groundwork Laid: First time the team works together as a whole, introduction of Dwayne Johnson’s “Luke Hobbs”. Evidence that Letty is alive appears in a post credit scene. 

Fast & Furious 6 (2013)

Dir. Justin Lin

78/100

After the excitement of the heist in Brazil, the team go their separate ways until Luke Hobbs bring them back in to take down Owen Shaw (Luke Evans), who has employed an amnesiac Letty to his crew. Yes, the franchise has brought in the very common soap opera trope of “amnesia”. Justin Lin continues his streak of filming the franchise very well, and still keeping the characters and the story first. 

Groundwork Laid: Introduction of the Shaws. 

Furious 7 (2015)

Dir. James Wan 

82/100

For the first time in 9 years, a Fast & Furious movie was not helmed by Justin Lin, but horror breakout star, James Wan. Wan brings a very new style to the franchise and a new way of shooting the film. His way of shooting action makes it more comprehensible for audiences to consume. While continuing the story of the team, it also introduces a new villain, and brother of the previous antagonist, Deckard Shaw, played wonderfully by Jason Statham. As well as shadow figure “Mr. Nobody” played by a gleefully weird Kurt Russell. 

Groundwork & Timeline Information: The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift takes place between Furious 7 and Fast & Furious 6. Showing that Tokyo Drift was a spinoff about what Han does after the death of his lover Gisele. It is also revealed that Deckard Shaw killed Han in retribution for what was done to his brother. Also the introduction of the hacker “Ramsey” played by GOT star Nathalie Emmanuel. 

The Fate of the Furious (2017)

Dir. F. Gary Gray

68/100

The latest in the main storyline of Fast & Furious sees Dom go rogue for unknown reasons… until they are known. A trope that has been done before, but not to the extreme that happens here. The New York City sequence alone proves that. However this does revert back to putting action and set pieces before story and characters which does take away the stakes of the film and is frustrating to say the least. However it is still a fun watch nonetheless. 

Groundwork Laid: Introduction of “super hacker” Cipher played by a dreads wearing Charlize Theron. Also confirming that Dom had a son with former flame Elena (Elsa Pataky).

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